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Two Women on the Subway, New York City, Black and White Street Photography 1938-1941 by Walker Evans
Two Women on the Subway, New York City, Black and White Street Photography 1938-1941 by Walker Evans
Two Women on the Subway, New York City, Black and White Street Photography 1938-1941 by Walker Evans
Two Women on the Subway, New York City, Black and White Street Photography 1938-1941 by Walker Evans
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Two Women on the Subway, New York City, Black and White Street Photography 1938-1941 by Walker Evans
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Two Women on the Subway, New York City, Black and White Street Photography 1938-1941 by Walker Evans
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Two Women on the Subway, New York City, Black and White Street Photography 1938-1941 by Walker Evans
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Two Women on the Subway, New York City, Black and White Street Photography 1938-1941 by Walker Evans

Two Women on the Subway, New York City, Black and White Street Photography 1938-1941 by Walker Evans

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A classic black and white photograph from the late 1930s to early 1940s, Two Women on The Subway in New York City is by a master of 20th century photography. In an edition of 75, the gelatin silver image was printed c.1978. The print is numbered #49 in an edition of 75.

Two Women on the Subway, New York City, c. 1938-41 by Walker Evans is an 11.25" x 11" black and white photograph, with image size 4.75" x 7". The photographer's embossed blind stamp is on the lower right margin.

The photographer needed no real excuse to explain his ability to translate fleeting moments into pictures memorial: “I used to try to figure out precisely what I was seeing all the time, until I discovered I didn’t need to. If the thing is there, why, there it is.” - Walker Evans

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Artist's Bio:

Walker Evans' (1903-1975) primary subjects were poor Americans found in rural settings, roadside stands, cheap cafes, simple bedrooms, and small-town main streets.
He was drawn to capturing people when “their guard is down, and the mask is off.”

The depression years of 1935-36 were some of the peak years for Evans's work. During those important years Evans honed his skills of observation: “Stare. It is the way to educate your eye, and more. Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You are not here long.” His iconic images of small town barbers, churches, and cemeteries reveal a deep respect for the common man. In addition to the iconic "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men" a book of photos by Walker Evans and text by American writer James Agee, published in 1941, Evans' book "First and Last" included the Burroughs Family photographs.

From the first day he turned to his camera, he brought literature, lyricism, irony, and storytelling to the art of photography. "Leaving aside the mysteries and the inequities of human talent, brains, taste, and reputations, the matter of art in photography may come down to this: it is the capture and projection of the delights of seeing; it is the defining of observation full and felt." - Walker Evans

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